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2006

2005



  • Allcock, A. L. On the confusion surrounding Pareledone charcoti (Joubin, 1905) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae): endemic radiation in the Southern Ocean. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 143, 75-108 (2005).
    itemfields key6U8VP66S
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleOn the confusion surrounding Pareledone charcoti (Joubin, 1905) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae): endemic radiation in the Southern Ocean
    AuthorAllcock, A. L.
    AbstractUntil recently, all papillated specimens of Pareledone were ascribed to the species Pareledone charcoti (Joubin, 1905): of which R aurorae (Berry, 1917) was considered a junior synonym. Re-examination of the papillated type material of Pareledone, coupled with extensive fishing over several years off the Antarctic Peninsula, has led to a revision of this position. Seven new species of papillated Pareledone are identified from the Antarctic Peninsula region. They, are identified by subtle taxonomic characters, such as the morphology and placement of their papillae: although traditional indices often fail to separate the species. Whilst apparently sympatric, there is some evidence of niche separation of these species with respect to depth. A key is provided for their identification.
    PublicationZoological Journal of the Linnean Society
    Volume143
    Issue1
    Pages75-108
    Datejanvier 2005
    DOI10.1111/j.1096-3642.2004.00146.x
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2004.00146.x
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z

  • Ashford, J., Duhamel, G., Jones, C. & Bobko, S. Age, growth and mortality of Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) caught off Kerguelen. CCAMLR Science 12, 29-41 (2005).
    itemfields keyQT4TFDKP
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleAge, growth and mortality of Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) caught off Kerguelen
    AuthorAshford, J.
    AuthorDuhamel, Guy
    AuthorJones, C.
    AuthorBobko, S.
    AbstractAges of Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) caught off Kerguelen in 1999 were estimated by reading transverse-sectioned otoliths. Randomly interspersed otoliths from reference collections were used to measure precision; relative bias for the age data was estimated to be –0.6 years and residual variance 2.9. Age distributions of toothfish caught by two vessels showed discrepancies due to gear-specific catchability, or differences in the available population with depth or season. Age–length keys were constructed for use in assessing toothfish catches made by trawlers and longliners at Kerguelen, and longevity was estimated to be 36 years. Total instantaneous mortality Z was estimated to be between 0.09 and 0.12. Significant differences in age-at-length data between sexes were found, estimating von Bertalanffy parameters for males to be L∞ = 95.9, K = 0.12, t0 = –4.6 and for females L∞ = 103.5, K = 0.11, t0 = –4.7.
    PublicationCCAMLR Science
    Volume12
    Pages29-41
    Date2005
    URLhttp://www.ccamlr.org/en/publications/science_journal/ccamlr-science-volume-12/ccamlr-science-volume-1229-41
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Australian Antarctic Division, Heard Island and McDonald Island Marine Reserve_Management Plan. (2005).at
    itemfields keyCA5WGBR8
    Version99
    TypeBook
    TitleHeard Island and McDonald Island Marine Reserve_Management Plan
    AuthorAustralian Antarctic Division,
    Date2005
    ISBN1 876 93408 5
    URLhttp://www.heardisland.aq/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/2112/HIMIMR_MP.pdf
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T16:53:46Z


  • Brandt, A. Evolution of Antarctic biodiversity in the context of the past: the importance of the Southern Ocean deep sea. Antarctic Science 17, 509-521 (2005).
    itemfields keyQISASN8T
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleEvolution of Antarctic biodiversity in the context of the past: the importance of the Southern Ocean deep sea
    AuthorBrandt, Angelika
    AbstractPresent day Southern Ocean benthic biodiversity is the result of climatic changes based on the break-up of Gondwana in the Cretaceous and the Cenozoic and the physiological potential of the fauna to cope with the climatic deterioration. Though many taxa survived the thermal drop in ocean bottom temperatures, zoogeographic ranges changed and some faunal elements even became extinct, e.g. benthic decapods and teleost fish, opening up new ecological niches and the potential for enormous adaptive radiations within some taxa, like the amphipods and isopods (peracarid crustaceans) and notothenioid fish. Ice-sheet extensions and retreats might have enhanced speciation processes as well as eurybathy. Biodiversity on the Antarctic shelf is high within the polychaetes, molluscs, and echinoderms, and within the amphipods and isopods possibly due to the Cenozoic extinction of the benthic decapods. Moreover, some shelf areas are characterized by accumulations of large suspension feeders like poriferans, bryozoans, ascidians, gorgonians, and hydroids. Palaeoclimatic changes also caused that many taxa of the modern, present day Southern Ocean benthic organisms are characterized by gigantism, slow metabolism, longevity, and a reduced number of offspring combined with late maturation. However, our biological knowledge is mainly confined to Southern Ocean shelf organism; we do not know much about the composition, biodiversity and zoogeography of the Southern Ocean deep sea animals. On this background the deep sea expeditions ANDEEPwere born and the background and first results of these are presented herein
    PublicationAntarctic Science
    Volume17
    Issue04
    Pages509-521
    Datenovembre 2005
    DOI10.1017/S0954102005002932
    URLhttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&pdftype=1&fid=355404&jid=ANS&volumeId=17&issueId=04&aid=355403
    TagsANDEEP · Southern Ocea · deep sea · geological history · marine biodiversity
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z

  • Carter, A. (A. ), Muller, R. (R. ) & Thompson, A. (A. A. ) The rate of decompression sickness in scientific diving at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (Townsville) 1996 to 2001. (2005).at
    itemfields keyPJCN2FS4
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleThe rate of decompression sickness in scientific diving at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (Townsville) 1996 to 2001
    AuthorCarter, Anthony (A)
    AuthorMuller, Reinhold (R)
    AuthorThompson, Angus (AA)
    Date2005-08-01
    Languageen
    URLhttp://epubs.aims.gov.au//handle/11068/7104
    Accessed2017-04-29T12:21:21Z
    Library Catalogepubs.aims.gov.au
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Clarke, A., Barnes, D. K. A. & Hodgson, D. A. How isolated is Antarctica? Trends in ecology & evolution 20, 1-3 (2005).
    itemfields keyFEVIREHB
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleHow isolated is Antarctica?
    AuthorClarke, Andrew
    AuthorBarnes, David K.A.
    AuthorHodgson, Dominic A
    AbstractThe traditional view of Antarctica and the surrounding Southern Ocean as an isolated system is now being challenged by the recent discovery at the Antarctic Peninsula of adult spider crabs Hyas areneus from the North Atlantic and of larvae of subpolar marine invertebrates. These observations question whether the well described biogeographical similarities between the benthic fauna of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Magellan region of South America result from history (the two regions were once contiguous), or from a previously unrecognized low level of faunal exchange. Such exchange might be influenced by regional climate change, and also exacerbated by changes in human impact.
    PublicationTrends in ecology & evolution
    Volume20
    Issue1
    Pages1-3
    Datejanvier 2005
    DOI10.1016/j.tree.2004.10.004
    URLhttp://www.cell.com/trends/ecology-evolution/fulltext/S0169-5347(04)00306-4
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z

  • David, B., Choné, T., Festeau, A., Mooi, R. & De Ridder, C. Biodiversity of Antarctic echinoids: a comprehensive and interactive database. Scientia Marina 69, 201-203 (2005).
    itemfields keyMCSAT3P3
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleBiodiversity of Antarctic echinoids: a comprehensive and interactive database
    AuthorDavid, Bruno
    AuthorChoné, Thérèse
    AuthorFesteau, Alain
    AuthorMooi, Rich
    AuthorDe Ridder, Chantal
    AbstractEighty-one echinoid species are present south of the Antarctic Convergence, and they represent an important component of the benthic fauna. “Antarctic echinoids” is an interactive database synthesising the results of more than 100 years of Antarctic expeditions, and comprising information about all echinoid species. It includes illustrated keys for deter- mination of the species, and information about their morphology and ecology (text, illustrations and glossary) and their dis- tribution (maps and histograms of bathymetrical distribution); the sources of the information (bibliography, collections and expeditions) are also provided. All these data (taxonomic, morphologic, geographic, bathymetric...) can be interactively queried in two main ways: (1) display of listings that can be browsed, sorted according to various criteria, or printed; and (2) interactive requests crossing the different kinds of data. Many other possibilities are offered, and an on-line help file i s also available.
    PublicationScientia Marina
    Volume69
    IssueSuppl. 2
    Pages201-203
    Date2005
    URLhttp://scientiamarina.revistas.csic.es/index.php/scientiamarina/article/viewFile/324/324
    TagsAntarctic · Biodiversity · Database · Sea Urchins
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • de Queiroz, A. The resurrection of oceanic dispersal in historical biogeography. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 20, 68-73 (2005).
    itemfields keyKZJQVMH3
    Version1509
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleThe resurrection of oceanic dispersal in historical biogeography
    Authorde Queiroz, Alan
    PublicationTrends in Ecology & Evolution
    Volume20
    Issue2
    Pages68-73
    Date02/2005
    Languageen
    DOI10.1016/j.tree.2004.11.006
    ISSN01695347
    URLhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169534704003362
    Accessed2019-04-07T11:07:00Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    Date Added2019-04-07T11:07:00Z
    Modified2019-04-20T13:36:14Z

  • Duhamel, G., Gasco, P. & Davaine, P. Poissons des iles Kerguelen et Crozet: Guide règional de l'ocèan. (Austral. Musèum national d'Histoire naturelle, 2005).
    itemfields key47B3HM8M
    Version1360
    TypeBook
    TitlePoissons des iles Kerguelen et Crozet: Guide règional de l'ocèan
    AuthorDuhamel, G.
    AuthorGasco, P.
    AuthorDavaine, P.
    AbstractLittle is known about the fish diversity of the Kergulelen and Crozet Islands.These islands are French overseas to the terres Australes et Antarctiques francaises, situated in the Indian sedor of the Southern Ocean. Ichthyological surveys oller many years have revealed 125 fish which range from the kelp belt of the coastal waters to the offshore pelagic layers, and five freshwater species, which occur in the inland drainage systems. The purpose of this guide is to improve our knowledge of these fishes. It is based primarily on the scientifically important fish colledions of Museum of Natural History (MNHN) Paris, as well as on information derived from recent pure and fishery-applied research. Each species (included 17 new records) is described in detail, with orignal (where possible) drawings, photographs and figures
    SeriesPatrimoines naturels
    Series Number63
    PlaceParis
    PublisherAustral. Musèum national d'Histoire naturelle
    Date2005
    # of Pages419
    ISBN978-2-85653-578-3
    Short TitlePoissons des iles Kerguelen et Crozet
    URL
    Library CatalogGemeinsamer Bibliotheksverbund ISBN
    Date Added2019-03-14T00:22:05Z
    Modified2019-03-14T00:22:05Z

  • Duhamel, G., Gasco, N. & Davaine, P. Poissons des Ïles Kerguelen et Crozet. Guide régional de l'Océan Austral. (Publications scientifiques du Muséum. Patrimoines naturels, 2005).
    itemfields keyHW2N9NQ7
    Version47
    TypeBook
    TitlePoissons des Ïles Kerguelen et Crozet. Guide régional de l'Océan Austral
    AuthorDuhamel, Guy
    AuthorGasco, Nicolas
    AuthorDavaine, Patrick
    AbstractLes îles françaises du secteur indien de l'océan Austral (Kerguelen et Crozet, territoire des terres Australes et Antarctiques françaises) présentent une diversité en poissons peu connue. Pourtant, avec 125 espèces marines occupant des milieux variés, des zones de forêts sous-marines d'algues géantes au domaine pélagique du grand large, et cinq espèces d'eau douce introduites ayant colonisé lacs et rivières, elles font l'objet de recherches depuis de nombreuses années. L'objectif de ce guide est de restituer la connaissance grâce aux importantes collections du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle et aux résultats des programmes scientifiques, tant fondamentaux que liés à l'halieutique. Chaque espèce (dont 17 nouvelles signalisations pour cet océan) fait l'objet d'une fiche descriptive détaillée renseignant sa biologie, sa répartition et comportant des dessins, des photographies et des figures, pour la plupart originaux.
    PublisherPublications scientifiques du Muséum. Patrimoines naturels
    Date2005
    # of Pages1
    ISBN2-85653-578-X
    URL
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Thiel, M. & Gutow, L.Oceanography and Marine Biology (Gibson, R.Gordon, J. & Atkinson, R.) 43, 279-418 (CRC Press, 2005).
    itemfields keyEICQE58R
    Version1395
    TypeBook Section
    TitleThe Ecology of Rafting in the Marine Environment. Ii. the Rafting Organisms and Community
    EditorGibson, R
    EditorGordon, J
    EditorAtkinson, R
    AuthorThiel, Martin
    AuthorGutow, Lars
    Book TitleOceanography and Marine Biology
    Volume43
    PublisherCRC Press
    Date2005-06-24
    Pages279-418
    Languageen
    ISBN978-0-8493-3597-6 978-1-4200-3744-9
    URLhttp://www.crcnetbase.com/doi/abs/10.1201/9781420037449.ch7
    Accessed2019-03-15T10:43:12Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    ExtraDOI: 10.1201/9781420037449.ch7
    Date Added2019-03-15T10:43:12Z
    Modified2019-03-15T11:03:33Z


  • Guisan, A. & Thuiller, W. Predicting species distribution: offering more than simple habitat models. Ecology Letters 8, 993-1009 (2005).
    itemfields key74JQ7BSL
    Version258
    TypeJournal Article
    TitlePredicting species distribution: offering more than simple habitat models
    AuthorGuisan, Antoine
    AuthorThuiller, Wilfried
    PublicationEcology Letters
    Volume8
    Issue9
    Pages993-1009
    Date09/2005
    Languageen
    DOI10.1111/j.1461-0248.2005.00792.x
    ISSN1461-023X, 1461-0248
    Short TitlePredicting species distribution
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2005.00792.x
    Accessed2018-08-18T21:21:47Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2018-08-18T21:21:47Z
    Modified2018-08-18T21:21:47Z

  • Hayward, B. W. & Morley, M. S. Zonation and biogeography of the intertidal biota of Subantarctic Campbell and Auckland Islands, New Zealand. Records of the Auckland Museum 42, 7-33 (2005).
    itemfields key25CZ5NM4
    Version640
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleZonation and biogeography of the intertidal biota of Subantarctic Campbell and Auckland Islands, New Zealand
    AuthorHayward, Bruce W.
    AuthorMorley, Margaret S.
    PublicationRecords of the Auckland Museum
    Volume42
    Pages7-33
    Date2005
    URLhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/42905874
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2019-01-13T18:00:12Z
    Modified2019-01-13T18:04:41Z


  • Heads, M. Towards a panbiogeography of the seas. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 84, 675-723 (2005).
    itemfields keyIASM7XN7
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleTowards a panbiogeography of the seas
    AuthorHeads, Michael
    AbstractA contrast is drawn between the concept of speciation favoured in the Darwin–Wallace biogeographic paradigm (founder dispersal from a centre of origin) and in panbiogeography (vicariance or allopatry). Ordinary ecological dispersal is distinguished from founder dispersal. A survey of recent literature indicates that ideas on many aspects of marine biology are converging on a panbiogeographic view. Panbiogeographic conclusions supported in recent work include the following observations: fossils give minimum ages for groups and most taxa are considerably older than their earliest known fossil; Pacific/Atlantic divergence calibrations based on the rise of the Isthmus of Panama at 3 Ma are flawed; for these two reasons most molecular clock calibrations for marine groups are also flawed; the means of dispersal of taxa do not correlate with their actual distributions; populations of marine species may be closed systems because of self-recruitment; most marine taxa show at least some degree of vicariant differentiation and vicariance is surprisingly common among what were previously assumed to be uniform, widespread taxa; mangrove and seagrass biogeography and migration patterns in marine taxa are best explained by vicariance; the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean represent major biogeographic regions and diversity in the Indo-Australian Archipelago is related to Indian Ocean/Pacific Ocean vicariance; distribution in the Pacific is not the result of founder dispersal; distribution in the south-west Pacific is accounted for by accretion tectonics which bring about distribution by accumulation and juxtaposition of communities; tectonic uplift and subsidence can directly affect vertical distribution of marine communities; substantial parallels exist between the biogeography of terrestrial and marine taxa; biogeographically and geologically composite areas are tractable using panbiogeographic analysis; metapopulation models are more realistic than the mainland/island dispersal models used in the equilibrium theory of island biogeography; and regional biogeography is a major determinant of local community composition.
    PublicationBiological Journal of the Linnean Society
    Volume84
    Issue4
    Pages675-723
    Datemars 2005
    DOI10.1111/j.1095-8312.2005.00466.x
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2005.00466.x
    TagsEcology · Marine · dispersal · distribution · metapopulation · molecular systematics · speciation · tectonics · vicariance
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Kinlan, B. P., Gaines, S. D. & Lester, S. E. Propagule dispersal and the scales of marine community process: Marine dispersal scales. Diversity and Distributions 11, 139-148 (2005).
    itemfields keyD53QBU3B
    Version1461
    TypeJournal Article
    TitlePropagule dispersal and the scales of marine community process: Marine dispersal scales
    AuthorKinlan, Brian P.
    AuthorGaines, Steven D.
    AuthorLester, Sarah E.
    PublicationDiversity and Distributions
    Volume11
    Issue2
    Pages139-148
    Date2005-03-07
    Languageen
    DOI10.1111/j.1366-9516.2005.00158.x
    ISSN13669516, 14724642
    Short TitlePropagule dispersal and the scales of marine community process
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1366-9516.2005.00158.x
    Accessed2019-04-07T14:03:08Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    Date Added2019-04-07T14:03:08Z
    Modified2019-04-07T14:03:08Z


  • López-González, P. J. A new gorgonian genus from deep-sea Antarctic waters (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Plexauridae). Helgoland Marine Research 60, 1-6 (2005).
    itemfields key9RWR88S3
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleA new gorgonian genus from deep-sea Antarctic waters (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Plexauridae)
    AuthorLópez-González, Pablo J.
    AbstractMesogligorgia scotiae gen. nov., sp. nov. is described and illustrated from a colony collected in the Scotia Sea, 2,201–2,213 m in depth, on the ANDEEP-I cruise. The new taxon is placed in the family Plexauridae because of: 1) the presence of a horny axis with a cross- chambered central core and numerous loculi, 2) retrac- tile polyps in calyces with distinct spicular components, and 3) armed polyps with large sclerites with a poorly- developed collaret and eight well-developed points. The irregularly distributed sclerites running along the axis, into a thick mesogloeal coenenchyme, and the elongated spindles with irregular ends are the most distinctive characters of the newly proposed genus.
    PublicationHelgoland Marine Research
    Volume60
    Issue1
    Pages1-6
    Dateaoût 2005
    DOI10.1007/s10152-005-0008-1
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10152-005-0008-1
    TagsAlcyonacea · Antarctica · Cnidaria · Mesogligorgia · Octocorallia · Plexauridae
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • López-González, P. J. & Gili, J. - M. Two new dimorphic soft-coral species (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) from Antarctica. Hydrobiologia 544, 143-153 (2005).
    itemfields keySS5WF3IS
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleTwo new dimorphic soft-coral species (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) from Antarctica
    AuthorLópez-González, Pablo J.
    AuthorGili, Josep-Maria
    AbstractSphaeralcyon shackletoni sp. nov. and Sphaeralcyon scotti sp. nov. are described and illustrated from material collected at the Scotia Sea and Weddell Sea on the Polarstern cruisesANTXIX/3 (ANDEEP-I),ANTXIX/5 (LAMPOS), and ANT XXI/2 (BENDEX). With the discovery of Sphaeralcyon shackletoni and S. scotti, three species are now known in the genus Sphaeralcyon, all them reported from the Southern Ocean. The diagnosis of the genus has been slightly modified to accommodate some of the characters of the new species. Introduction
    PublicationHydrobiologia
    Volume544
    Issue1
    Pages143-153
    Dateaoût 2005
    DOI10.1007/s10750-004-8338-6
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10750-004-8338-6
    TagsAlcyoniidae · Antarctica · Cnidaria · Octocorallia · Sphaeralcyon
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Peck, L. S. Prospects for survival in the Southern Ocean: vulnerability of benthic species to temperature change. Antarctic Science 17, 497-507 (2005).
    itemfields keyZ4Q9EIS7
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleProspects for survival in the Southern Ocean: vulnerability of benthic species to temperature change
    AuthorPeck, Lloyd S.
    AbstractOrganisms have a limited number of responses that enhance survival in changing environments. They can: 1. Cope within existing physiological flexibility; 2. Adapt to changing conditions; or 3. Migrate to sites that allow survival. Species inhabiting coastal seabed sites around Antarctica have poorer physiological capacities to deal with change than species elsewhere. They die when temperatures are raised by only 5–10°C above the annual average, and many species lose the ability to perform essential functions, e.g. swimming in scallops or burying in infaunal bivalve molluscs when temperatures are raised only 2–3°C. The ability to adapt, or evolve new characters to changing conditions depends, at least in part, on generation time. Antarctic benthic species grow slowly and develop at rates often x5–x10 slower than similar temperate species. They also live to great age, and exhibit deferred maturity. Longer generation times reduce the opportunities to produce novel mutations, and result in poorer capacities to adapt to change. Intrinsic capacities to colonize new sites and migrate away from deteriorating conditions depend on adult abilities to locomote over large distances, or for reproductive stages to drift for extended periods. The slow development of Antarctic benthic species means their larvae do spend extended periods in the water column. However, whereas most continents have coastlines extending over a wide range of latitude, Antarctica is almost circular in outline, is isolated from other oceans by the circumpolar current, and its coastline covers few degrees of latitude. Thus in a warming environment there are fewer places to migrate to. On all three major criteria Antarctic benthic species appear less capable than species elsewhere of responding to change in ways that can enhance survival.
    PublicationAntarctic Science
    Volume17
    Issue04
    Pages497-507
    Datenovembre 2005
    LanguageEnglish
    DOI10.1017/S0954102005002920
    URLhttp://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0954102005002920
    TagsAntarctic · Extinction · Marine · climate change · stress · temperature limits.
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Reynolds, R. W., Zhang, H. - M., Smith, T. M., Gentemann, C. L. & Wentz, F. Impacts of in situ and additional satellite data on the accuracy of a sea-surface temperature analysis for climate. International Journal of Climatology 25, 857-864 (2005).
    itemfields keyR68FUBGR
    Version412
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleImpacts of in situ and additional satellite data on the accuracy of a sea-surface temperature analysis for climate
    AuthorReynolds, Richard W.
    AuthorZhang, Huai-Min
    AuthorSmith, Thomas M.
    AuthorGentemann, Chelle L.
    AuthorWentz, Frank
    AbstractAdditional in situ and satellite data improve the accuracy of a blended (in situ and satellite) sea-surface temperature (SST) analysis using optimum interpolation (OI). Two studies were conducted to evaluate the impacts of in situ and additional satellite data. One study evaluated the adequacy of the recent in situ network. Because of the high coverage of satellite data, in situ data used in the analysis tends to be overwhelmed by satellite data. Thus, the most important role of the in situ data in the analysis is to correct large-scale satellite biases. Simulations with different buoy densities showed the need for at least two buoys on a 10° spatial grid. This will ensure that satellite biases do not exceed 0.5 °C. Using this criterion, regions were identified where additional buoys are needed. A second study evaluated the impact of satellite SST retrievals from the tropical rainfall measuring mission microwave imager (TMI) on the OI analysis. The present version only uses infrared satellite data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. The results of the intercomparisons showed that both AVHRR and TMI data have biases that must be corrected for climate studies. The addition of TMI data clearly improved the OI analysis accuracy without bias correction, but was less significant when bias correction was used. However, there are areas of the ocean with limited in situ data and restricted AVHRR coverage due to cloud cover, and the use of both TMI and AVHRR should improve the accuracy of the analysis in those areas.
    PublicationInternational Journal of Climatology
    Volume25
    Issue7
    Pages857-864
    Date2005-06-15
    Languageen
    DOI10.1002/joc.1168
    ISSN0899-8418, 1097-0088
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/joc.1168
    Accessed2018-09-24T13:50:35Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    Date Added2018-09-24T13:50:35Z
    Modified2018-09-24T13:53:30Z


  • Rodríguez, E. & López-González, P. J. New record of the sea anemone Kadosactis antarctica (Carlgren, 1928): re-description of an Antarctic deep-sea sea anemone, and a discussion of its generic and familial placement. Helgoland Marine Research 59, 301-309 (2005).
    itemfields keyDBAZUSB4
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleNew record of the sea anemone Kadosactis antarctica (Carlgren, 1928): re-description of an Antarctic deep-sea sea anemone, and a discussion of its generic and familial placement
    AuthorRodríguez, Estefanía
    AuthorLópez-González, Pablo J.
    AbstractSagartiogeton antarcticus Carlgren, 1928 is an Antarctic deep-sea species of sea anemone only known from its holotype. The species has been assigned to the genera Sagartiogeton and Kadosactis, and is currently placed within the family Kadosactidae Riemann-Zu¨ rneck, 1991. Kadosactis antarctica is re-described based on 11 specimens collected during the cruise of the R/V Polarstern ANT XIX/3 (ANDEEP-I) to the Scotia Sea and off the South Shetland Islands (Antarctica). The description includes a complete account of cnidae and photographs. Because the mesogloea is thickened on the aboral surface on the base of the tentacles, this feature becomes a generic character of Kadosactis rather than a differential specific character among the species of the genus as previously proposed. Furthermore, the known distribution of the species is enlarged to include the southern branch of the Scotia Sea.
    PublicationHelgoland Marine Research
    Volume59
    Issue4
    Pages301-309
    Dateseptembre 2005
    DOI10.1007/s10152-005-0005-4
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10152-005-0005-4
    TagsActiniaria · Deep-sea · Kadosactidae · Kadosactis · Sagartiogeton · South Shetland Islands
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Rouault, M., Mélice, J. - L., Reason, C. J. C. & Lutjeharms, J. R. E. Climate variability at Marion Island, Southern Ocean, since 1960. Journal of Geophysical Research 110, 1-9 (2005).
    itemfields keyQWTM5829
    Version441
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleClimate variability at Marion Island, Southern Ocean, since 1960
    AuthorRouault, Mathieu
    AuthorMélice, Jean-Luc
    AuthorReason, Chris J.C.
    AuthorLutjeharms, Johann R.E.
    PublicationJournal of Geophysical Research
    Volume110
    IssueC05007
    Pages1-9
    Date2005
    Languageen
    DOI10.1029/2004JC002492
    ISSN0148-0227
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1029/2004JC002492
    Accessed2018-10-02T15:28:42Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    Date Added2018-10-02T15:28:42Z
    Modified2018-10-02T15:36:48Z


  • Rouault, M., Mélice, J. - L., Reason, C. J. C. & Lutjeharms, J. R. E. Climate variability at Marion Island, Southern Ocean, since 1960. Journal of Geophysical Research 110, (2005).
    itemfields keyKEBMBR97
    Version523
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleClimate variability at Marion Island, Southern Ocean, since 1960
    AuthorRouault, Mathieu
    AuthorMélice, Jean-Luc
    AuthorReason, Chris J.C.
    AuthorLutjeharms, Johann R.E.
    PublicationJournal of Geophysical Research
    Volume110
    IssueC5
    Date2005
    Languageen
    DOI10.1029/2004JC002492
    ISSN0148-0227
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1029/2004JC002492
    Accessed2018-10-30T18:09:27Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2018-10-30T18:09:27Z
    Modified2018-10-30T18:10:23Z
  • Tatiàn, M., Antacli, J. C. & Sahade, R. Ascidians (Tunicata, Ascidiacea)- species distribution along the Scotia Arc. Scientia Marina 69, 205-214 (2005).
    itemfields keyFXAPRQZD
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleAscidians (Tunicata, Ascidiacea)- species distribution along the Scotia Arc
    AuthorTatiàn, Marcos
    AuthorAntacli, Julieta Carolina
    AuthorSahade, Ricardo
    AbstractAscidians are found in all the oceans. The Polar Front is considered a strong barrier, especially for benthic organisms, separating the Southern Ocean from other oceans. Its influence on ascidian species present at the boundary of the Magellan and Antarctic regions along the Scotia Arc and on the species composition at each station is inferred from the samples taken during the “LAMPOS” cruise. Ascidians were collected by Agassiz (AGT) and bottom (GSN) trawls at depths between 250 and 587 m on different types of substrate. Of 25 identified species/morphospecies one is new and eight were found in new localities, enlarging the known range of five of these species. Muddy bottoms were found to support higher species richness than hard bottoms, and the South Georgia Islands are found to be the northern limit for Antarctic species and the southern limit for Magellan ones. Affinity between the ascidian fauna of the Magellan region and the Antarc- tic is slightly stronger than was previously considered; there is also a species gradient along the Scotia Arc, which can be regarded as a bridge between the two regions
    PublicationScientia Marina
    Volume69
    IssueSuppl. 2
    Pages205-214
    Date2005
    URL
    TagsBiogeography · Polar Front · Scotia Arc · Tunicata
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Thatje, S. The future fate of the Antarctic marine biota? Trends in ecology & evolution 20, 418-9 (2005).
    itemfields keyKCT34N5M
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleThe future fate of the Antarctic marine biota?
    AuthorThatje, Sven
    PublicationTrends in ecology & evolution
    Volume20
    Issue8
    Pages418-9
    Dateaoût 2005
    DOI10.1016/j.tree.2005.04.013
    URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534705001138
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Thatje, S., Hillenbrand, C. - D. & Larter, R. On the origin of Antarctic marine benthic community structure. Trends in ecology & evolution 20, 534-540 (2005).
    itemfields keyEPIQ835I
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleOn the origin of Antarctic marine benthic community structure.
    AuthorThatje, Sven
    AuthorHillenbrand, Claus-Dieter
    AuthorLarter, Rob
    AbstractEnvironmental conditions fostering marine communities around Antarctica differ fundamentally from those in the rest of the world's oceans, particularly in terms of pronounced climatic fluctuations and extreme cold. Here, we argue that the rarity of pelagic larval stages in Antarctic marine benthic invertebrate species is a consequence of evolutionary temperature adaptation and that this has greatly contributed to the current structure of the Antarctic benthic community. In arguing this position, we challenge the likelihood of previously suggested survival strategies of benthic communities on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope during Cenozoic glacial periods. By integrating evidence from marine geology and geophysics, we suggest that the Antarctic continental shelf and slope were both unfavourable environments for benthic communities during glacial periods and that community survival was only possible in the deep sea or in shelters on the continental shelf as a result of the diachronism in maximum ice extent.
    PublicationTrends in ecology & evolution
    Volume20
    Issue10
    Pages534-540
    Dateoctobre 2005
    DOI10.1016/j.tree.2005.07.010
    URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534705002508
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z

  • Woelkerling, W. J., Gustavsen, G., Myklebost, H. E., Prestø, T. & Såstad, S. M. The coralline red algal herbarium of Mikael Foslie: revised catalogue with analyses. (NTNU, 2005).
    itemfields keyEIYLZVQZ
    Version1026
    TypeBook
    TitleThe coralline red algal herbarium of Mikael Foslie: revised catalogue with analyses
    AuthorWoelkerling, William J.
    AuthorGustavsen, Gry
    AuthorMyklebost, Heidi Elin
    AuthorPrestø, Tommy
    AuthorSåstad, Sigurd M.
    SeriesGunneria 77
    PublisherNTNU
    Date2005
    # of Pages1-625
    LanguageEnglish
    ISBN978-82-7126-717-9
    URL
    Date Added2019-02-10T14:11:03Z
    Modified2019-02-10T15:16:56Z

2004



  • Asensi, A., Delépine, R., Rousseau, F. & de Reviers, B. Morphology and taxonomy of Adenocystis longissima (Skottsberg) stat. nov. (Phaeophyceae) from subantarctic South America. Polar Biology 28, 82-91 (2004).
    itemfields keyZJZYA97K
    Version649
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleMorphology and taxonomy of Adenocystis longissima (Skottsberg) stat. nov. (Phaeophyceae) from subantarctic South America
    AuthorAsensi, A.
    AuthorDelépine, R.
    AuthorRousseau, F.
    Authorde Reviers, B.
    PublicationPolar Biology
    Volume28
    Issue1
    Pages82-91
    Date12/2004
    Languageen
    DOI10.1007/s00300-004-0650-0
    ISSN0722-4060, 1432-2056
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00300-004-0650-0
    Accessed2019-01-13T19:09:36Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2019-01-13T19:09:36Z
    Modified2019-01-13T19:09:36Z


  • Ayress, M. A., De Decker, P. & Coles, G. P. A taxonomic and distributional survey of marine benthonic Ostracoda off Kerguelen and Heard Islands, South Indian Ocean. Journal of Micropalaeontology 23, 15-38 (2004).
    itemfields key4RA3VIPN
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleA taxonomic and distributional survey of marine benthonic Ostracoda off Kerguelen and Heard Islands, South Indian Ocean
    AuthorAyress, M. A.
    AuthorDe Decker, P.
    AuthorColes, G. P.
    AbstractFrom an examination of 34 grab and dredge samples ranging from 110 m to 3584 m water depth, collected during Eltanin cruise 47 across the Kerguelen Plateau, 26 shallow-water and 35 deep-sea benthonic ostracod species have been identified. Systematic notes and illustrations of the common and some of the rare species are presented. Two new species are described: Philoneptunus cassidyi n. sp. and Taracythere abyssora n. sp. Comparisons made with the Atlantic and SW Pacific Oceans and circum-Antarctic regions indicate that the fauna comprises dominantly cosmopolitan deep-sea species while most of the other species have close affinities with the SW Pacific. In the Kerguelen material, seven distinct depth assemblages appear to correspond well with differing watermasses and there is evidence that the relatively shallow position of Antarctic Intermediate Water permits elevation of the upper depth limits of some deep-sea species. Some species have developed ornament of fine reticulation, features not previously seen in those species outside the Kerguelen region.
    PublicationJournal of Micropalaeontology
    Volume23
    Issue1
    Pages15-38
    Datemai 2004
    DOI10.1144/jm.23.1.15
    URLhttp://jm.lyellcollection.org/content/23/1/15.extract
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z

  • Bossard, D. C. Linked index to the H.M.S. Challenger Reports. (2004).at
    itemfields keyI2GTNQS2
    Version58
    TypeWeb Page
    TitleLinked index to the H.M.S. Challenger Reports
    AuthorBossard, David C.
    Date2004
    URLhttp://www.19thcenturyscience.org/HMSC/HMSC-INDEX/index-linked.htm
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:58:10Z


  • Brey, T., et al. Do Antarctic benthic invertebrates show an extended level of eurybathy? Antarctic Science 8, 3-6 (2004).
    itemfields keyPU6ZNKCT
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleDo Antarctic benthic invertebrates show an extended level of eurybathy?
    AuthorBrey, T.
    AuthorDahm, C.
    AuthorGorny, M.
    AuthorKlages, M.
    AuthorStiller, M.
    AuthorArntz, W.E.
    AbstractDepth distribution data were compared for 172 European and 157 Antarctic benthic invertebrate species occurring in the respective shelf areas. Antarctic species showed significantly wider depth ranges in selected families of the groups Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Amphipoda and Decapoda. No differences were found in Polychaeta, Asteroidea and Ophiuroidea, where European species also showed comparatively wide bathymetric ranges. These extended levels of eurybathy in the Antarctic benthos may be interpreted either as an evolutionary adaptation or pre-adaptation to the oscillation of shelf ice extension during the Antarctic glacial-interglacial cycle.
    PublicationAntarctic Science
    Volume8
    Issue01
    Pages3-6
    Datemai 2004
    LanguageEnglish
    DOI10.1017/S0954102096000028
    URLhttp://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0954102096000028
    Tagsamphipods · benthic invertebrates · bivalves · decapods · gastropods
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Chenuil, A., Gault, A. & Féral, J. - P. Paternity analysis in the Antarctic brooding sea urchin Abatus nimrodi . A pilot study. Polar Biology 27, 177-182 (2004).
    itemfields keyF46DZ2KF
    Version117
    TypeJournal Article
    TitlePaternity analysis in the Antarctic brooding sea urchin Abatus nimrodi . A pilot study
    AuthorChenuil, Anne
    AuthorGault, Agnès
    AuthorFéral, Jean-Pierre
    AbstractThe genus Abatus (Echinoidea: Spatangoida: Schizasteridae), endemic to the Southern Ocean, consists of several species which, like many other Antarctic marine invertebrates, brood their offspring. The modality of fertilization is not known in these species, whose direct observation and sampling are difficult. Parentage analyses by means of molecular markers may help to gain information on this stage of the life-cycle. In this pilot study, we analysed a brooding female and her offspring with dominant molecular markers—RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA). We established that each cohort present in the brooding pouches, i.e. gastrulae and juveniles, originated from at least two distinct father genotypes. Our original method of analysis of dominant marker data should have vast applications since it allows one to test, not only (1) the hypothesis that the progeny of a given mother originates from a single father, but also (2) the temporal stability of the paternal gene pool.
    PublicationPolar Biology
    Volume27
    Issue3
    Pages177-182
    Date2004-2-1
    LanguageEnglish
    DOI10.1007/s00300-003-0576-y
    ISSN0722-4060, 1432-2056
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00300-003-0576-y
    Accessed2017-05-08T10:22:45Z
    Library CatalogCrossRef
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2017-05-08T10:22:45Z
    Modified2017-05-08T10:25:53Z


  • Clarke, A., Aronson, R. B., Crame, J. A., Gili, J. -maria & Blake, D. B. Evolution and diversity of the benthic fauna of the Southern Ocean continental shelf. Antarctic Science 16, 559-568 (2004).
    itemfields keyUKMNCNS9
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleEvolution and diversity of the benthic fauna of the Southern Ocean continental shelf
    AuthorClarke, Andrew
    AuthorAronson, Richard B.
    AuthorCrame, J. Alistair
    AuthorGili, Josep-maria
    AuthorBlake, Daniel B.
    AbstractThe modern benthic fauna of the Antarctic continental shelf is characterized by the lack of active, skeleton-breaking (durophagous) predators such as crabs, lobsters and many fish, and the dominance in many areas of epifaunal suspension feeders. It has often been remarked that these ecological characteristics give the fauna a distinctly Palaeozoic feel, with the assumption that it may be an evolutionary relic. We now know that this is not so, and fossil evidence shows clearly that many of the taxa and life-styles that are absent now were previously present. The modern fauna has been shaped by a number of factors, important among which have been oceanographic changes and the onset of Cenozoic glaciation. Sea-water cooling, and periodic fragmentation of ranges and bathymetric shifts in distribution driven by variability in the size and extent of the continental ice cap on Milankovitch frequencies will all have caused both extinction and allopatric speciation. The modern glacial setting with relatively low terrestrial impact away from immediate coastal regions, and scouring by icebergs are the key factors influencing the ecology and population dynamics for the modern Antarctic benthos. Received
    PublicationAntarctic Science
    Volume16
    Issue4
    Pages559-568
    Datedécembre 2004
    LanguageEnglish
    DOI10.1017/S0954102004002329
    URLhttp://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0954102004002329
    TagsExtinction · Milankovitch · climatic cooling · glaciations · predation · speciation
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z
  • Collins, M. A., Allcock, A. L. & Belchier, M. Cephalopods of the South Georgia slope. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 84, 415-419 (2004).
    itemfields keyP337DNP4
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleCephalopods of the South Georgia slope
    AuthorCollins, Martin A.
    AuthorAllcock, A. Louise
    AuthorBelchier, Mark
    AbstractDuring January 2003 the bathymetric distribution of the cephalopod fauna of the South Georgia and Shag Rocks slope (100^900m) was investigated using a commercial bottom trawl. Forty-four trawl stations caught 193 cephalopod specimens including six species of octopod and seven of squid. The benthic octopods Pareledone turqueti and Adelieledone polymorpha were abundant in shallow water at South Georgia, being replaced byThaumeledone gunteri in greater depths. However, neither A. polymorpha norT. gunteri were caught on the adjacent Shag Rocks area. Two specimens of the deep-sea genus Graneledone were caught on the South Georgia slope. The most abundant squid species caught were Moroteuthis knipovitchi, Psychroteuthis glacialis and Slosarczykovia circumantarctica, which are primarily pelagic and may have been taken when their vertical migrations impinged on the slope.
    PublicationJournal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
    Volume84
    Pages415-419
    Date2004
    URL
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Gutt, J. Some “driving forces” structuring communities of the sublittoral Antarctic macrobenthos. Antarctic Science 12, 297-313 (2004).
    itemfields keyGD2G48IK
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleSome “driving forces” structuring communities of the sublittoral Antarctic macrobenthos
    AuthorGutt, Julian
    PublicationAntarctic Science
    Volume12
    Issue03
    Pages297-313
    Datemai 2004
    LanguageEnglish
    DOI10.1017/S0954102000000365
    URLhttp://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0954102000000365
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Kohlmeyer, J., Hawksworth, D. L. & Volkmann-Kohlmeyer, B. Observations on two marine and maritime “borderline” lichens: Mastodia tessellata and Collemopsidium pelvetiae. Mycological Progress 3, 51-56 (2004).
    itemfields keyK7HI72ZK
    Version902
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleObservations on two marine and maritime “borderline” lichens: Mastodia tessellata and Collemopsidium pelvetiae
    AuthorKohlmeyer, Jan
    AuthorHawksworth, David L.
    AuthorVolkmann-Kohlmeyer, Brigitte
    PublicationMycological Progress
    Volume3
    Issue1
    Pages51-56
    Date2/2004
    Languageen
    DOI10.1007/s11557-006-0076-x
    ISSN1617-416X, 1861-8952
    Short TitleObservations on two marine and maritime “borderline” lichens
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11557-006-0076-x
    Accessed2019-01-31T16:31:54Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    Date Added2019-01-31T16:31:54Z
    Modified2019-01-31T16:31:54Z


  • Massin, C. & Hétérier, V. On a new species of apodid, Taeniogyrus magnibaculus n. sp. (Echinodermata, Holothuroidea), from Antarctica, living on the spines of cidarid echinoids. Polar Biology 27, 441-444 (2004).
    itemfields key9W9X74RG
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleOn a new species of apodid, Taeniogyrus magnibaculus n. sp. (Echinodermata, Holothuroidea), from Antarctica, living on the spines of cidarid echinoids
    AuthorMassin, Claude
    AuthorHétérier, V.
    AbstractThe present paper describes a new apodid holothuroid living on the spines of cidarid echinoids. This new species is characterised by large ossicles and especially by huge rods in the tentacles. A table summarises the characteristics of the known Taeniogyrus species.
    PublicationPolar Biology
    Volume27
    Issue7
    Pages441-444
    Datejuin 2004
    DOI10.1007/s00300-004-0607-3
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00300-004-0607-3
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z
  • O'Loughlin, M. P. & Waters, J. M. A molecular and morphological revision of genera of Asterinidae (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). Memoirs of Museum Victoria 61(1), 1-40 (2004).
    itemfields keyPFX5AJI2
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleA molecular and morphological revision of genera of Asterinidae (Echinodermata: Asteroidea)
    AuthorO'Loughlin, Mark P.
    AuthorWaters, Jon M.
    AbstractA molecular phylogeny has inspired a reappraisal of the systematics of the Asterinidae. New morphological characters are defined and illustrated and used to diagnose all genera. A table of the distribution of morphological characters among genera and key for genera of Asterinidae are provided. New genera of Asterinidae are erected: Aquilonastra O’Loughlin, Indianastra O’Loughlin, Parvulastra O’Loughlin and Pseudopatiria O’Loughlin. Patiria is raised out of synonymy with Asterina. Allopatiria is a junior synonym of Asterina, Manasterina is a junior synonym of Disasterina, and Paxillasterina is a junior synonym of Asterinides. The genus Asterinopsis and the genus and species Desmopatiria flexilis are nomina nuda. Patiriella tangribensis is a nomen dubium. Genera reviewed are: Anseropoda, Asterina, Asterinides, Callopatiria, Cryptasterina, Disasterina, Kampylaster, Meridiastra, Nepanthia, Paranepanthia, Patiria, Patiriella, Pseudasterina, Pseudonepanthia, Stegnaster, Tegulaster and Tremaster. Asterina cephea var. iranica is raised to species status. Enoplopatiria siderea is a junior synonym of Asterina stellifera. Disasterina leptalacantha var. africana is no longer recognised as a subspecies. Disasterina spinulifera is a junior synonym of Disasterina praesignis. A synonymy of Tremaster novaecaledoniae with Tremaster mirabilis is formalised. Asterinid species reassigned on the basis of molecular evidence and morphological congruity are new combinations: Aquilonastra anomala, A. batheri, A. burtoni, A. coronata, A. minor, A. scobinata, Meridiastra calcar, M. gunnii, M. medius, M. mortenseni, M. occidens, M. oriens, Paranepanthia aucklandensis, Parvulastra calcarata, P. exigua, P. parvivipara, P. vivipara, Patiria chilensis, P. miniata, P. pectinifera. Species reassigned on the basis of morphological evidence are new combinations: Aquilonastra cepheus, A. corallicola, A. heteractis, A. iranica, A. limboonkengi, A. rosea, Asterina ocellifera, Asterinides hartmeyeri, A. pilosa, A. pompom, Disasterina ceylanica, D. longispina, Indianastra inopinata, I. sarasini, Nepanthia pedicellaris, Parvulastra dyscrita, Pseudonepanthia briareus, P. gracilis, P. grangei, P. nigrobrunnea, P. reinga, P. troughtoni, Pseudopatiria obtusa, Tegulaster alba, T. leptalacantha, T. praesignis. Three species remain incertae sedis: Asterina lorioli, Asterina novaezelandiae and Nepanthia brachiata. Atable of asterinid species is provided, with original and current combinations. It is concluded that Asterinidae is a cosmopolitan family, mainly of shallow-water narrow-range genera but including some more widespread in deeper waters of all oceans.
    PublicationMemoirs of Museum Victoria
    Volume61(1)
    Pages1-40
    Date2004
    URL
    TagsAsterinidae · Asteroidea · Echinodermata · molecular · morphology · new genera · taxonomy
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Pearse, J. S. & Lockhart, S. J. Reproduction in cold water: paradigm changes in the 20th century and a role for cidaroid sea urchins. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography 51, 1533-1549 (2004).
    itemfields keyJZUAWN7P
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleReproduction in cold water: paradigm changes in the 20th century and a role for cidaroid sea urchins
    AuthorPearse, John S.
    AuthorLockhart, Susanne J.
    AbstractAt the beginning of the 20th century, powerful ideas about the biology of marine animals in cold waters (polar and deep sea) were in early stages of development. (1) General similarities between some Arctic and Antarctic species suggested a past or present continuity between the poles, possibly through tropical submergence. (2) The discovery of subantarctic species brooding their offspring suggested that supposedly harsh polar conditions select against species with pelagic, dispersive larvae. (3) The linkage between seasonal temperature changes and seasonal reproduction suggested that where temperatures were constant, as in polar and deep seas, reproduction would be aseasonal or continuous throughout the year. (4) Recognition of the phenomenon of metabolic temperature adaptation suggested that animals living in cold water should exhibit rates of physiological processes similar to rates in warmer environments. Observations and experiments throughout the first half of the 20th century generally supported and reinforced these ideas. During the second half of the 20th century, however, the generality of these paradigms broke down. Detailed analyses of fuller data indicated that Arctic, Antarctic, and deep-sea faunas are not the same and probably have different phylogenies reflecting different vicariant histories. Moreover, many species in these habitats have pelagic larvae, they generally spawn seasonally, and their physiological processes (respiration, gametogenesis, development, feeding, growth) are slow, showing little evidence of the expected temperature adaptation. Nevertheless, entering the 21st century, we are challenged by important exceptions that do support many of the earlier ideas. Bipolarity in some groups does indicate relict distributions, and other groups show equatorial submergence. Moreover, major species-rich clades in the Antarctic (unlike the Arctic) do brood their young. Most species with pelagic larvae produce non-feeding (lecithotrophic) larvae rather than feeding (planktotrophic) larvae, and these, along with brooding species, generally do reproduce throughout the year. Yet brooding is almost certainly not an adaptation to low temperatures and low larval food supply, as supposed earlier; instead, the species-rich clades of brooders probably reflect enhanced speciation under unique conditions in the Antarctic. In addition, despite recent evidence of constraints on metabolic flexibility, low metabolic rates may themselves be adaptations to Antarctic conditions. Just as a growing body of “exceptions” to the early 20th century paradigms led to their breakdown, these persisting exceptions to current ideas demand that our existing paradigms be re-examined for further insight into the biology of marine animals in cold water. Cidaroid echinoids, in particular, appear to support some of the earlier ideas. The group consists of one or possibly two clades that make up over 80% of the species of regular sea urchins in the Antarctic; several species extend into the deep sea. One putative species is nearly bipolar, extending from the Antarctic shelf into the deep sea and then north in the eastern Pacific to Alaska. All the species appear to brood embryos, but development in the brood might be facultative. Reproduction seems to be aseasonal, albeit infrequent. Growth rates are probably very slow and longevity very long. Current work begun with ANDEEP is directed at resolving the phylogenetic history of this group to better understand unusual reproductive and other features in cold-water marine animals.
    PublicationDeep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
    Volume51
    Issue14-16
    Pages1533-1549
    Datejuillet 2004
    DOI10.1016/j.dsr2.2004.06.023
    URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967064504001432
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z

  • Primo, C. & Vazquez, E. Zoogeography of the southern African ascidian fauna. Journal of Biogeography 31, 1987-2009 (2004).
    itemfields keyIN65PJSI
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleZoogeography of the southern African ascidian fauna
    AuthorPrimo, Carmen
    AuthorVazquez, Elsa
    PublicationJournal of Biogeography
    Volume31
    Issue12
    Pages1987-2009
    Datedécembre 2004
    URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2004.01144.x
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Stagg, H. M. J., et al. Geology of the Continental Margin of Enderby and Mac. Robertson Lands, East Antarctica: Insights from a Regional Data Set. Marine Geophysical Researches 25, 183-219 (2004).
    itemfields keySTI4JJJP
    Version1291
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleGeology of the Continental Margin of Enderby and Mac. Robertson Lands, East Antarctica: Insights from a Regional Data Set
    AuthorStagg, H. M. J.
    AuthorColwel, J. B.
    AuthorDireen, N. G.
    AuthorO’Brien, P. E.
    AuthorBernardel, G.
    AuthorBorissova, I.
    AuthorBrown, B. J.
    AuthorIshirara, T.
    PublicationMarine Geophysical Researches
    Volume25
    Issue3-4
    Pages183-219
    Date09/2004
    Languageen
    DOI10.1007/s11001-005-1316-1
    ISSN0025-3235, 1573-0581
    Short TitleGeology of the Continental Margin of Enderby and Mac. Robertson Lands, East Antarctica
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11001-005-1316-1
    Accessed2019-03-01T16:18:23Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    Date Added2019-03-01T16:18:23Z
    Modified2019-03-01T16:18:23Z

2003



  • Allcock, A. L., Collins, M. A. & Vecchione, M. A redescription of Graneledone verrucosa (Verrill, 1881) (Octopoda, Octopodidae). Journal Molluscan Studies 69, 135-143 (2003).
    itemfields keyJB7U4XIN
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleA redescription of Graneledone verrucosa (Verrill, 1881) (Octopoda, Octopodidae)
    AuthorAllcock, A. Louise
    AuthorCollins, Martin A.
    AuthorVecchione, Michael
    AbstractGraneledone verrucosa (Verrill 1881), the type species of the genus Graneledone, is redescribed based on historical material and previously unreported specimens that have resulted from an increase in deep-sea fishing in the North East Atlantic. Graneledone verrucosa var. media (Joubin 1918) was found to be invalid and is herein synonymized with G. verrucosa. Graneledone verrucosa is shown to inhabit deep water throughout the North Atlantic; its distribution extends from 20{degrees} to 65{degrees} N and from 9{degrees} to 75{degrees} W. A revised diagnosis is given for the genus Graneledone Joubin, 1918.
    PublicationJournal Molluscan Studies
    Volume69
    Issue2
    Pages135-143
    Datemai 2003
    DOI10.1093/mollus/69.2.135
    URLhttp://mollus.oxfordjournals.org/content/69/2/135.abstract
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Allcock, A. L., Hocberg, F. G., Rodhouse, P. G. K. & Thorpe, J. P. Adelieledone, a new genus of octopodid from the Southern Ocean. Antarctic Science 15, 415-424 (2003).
    itemfields keyET7RD8RA
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleAdelieledone, a new genus of octopodid from the Southern Ocean
    AuthorAllcock, A. Louise
    AuthorHocberg, F.G.
    AuthorRodhouse, P.G.K.
    AuthorThorpe, J.P.
    AbstractThe syntypes of the endemic Southern Ocean octopodid Pareledone polymorpha (Robson, 1930) were re-examined and measurements, counts and indices are presented. The two forms described by Robson, namely oblonga and affinis, are determined to have no taxonomic validity. The species polymorpha shows morphological similarities with Pareledone adelieana (Berry, 1917) but differs in relative arm lengths, sucker counts, external colouration and size at maturity. Both species are transferred to the new genus Adelieledone, which is separated from the genus Pareledone s.s. by the transverse ridges in the ligula groove of the hectocotylus, the sharp tip of the lower beak, the enlarged posterior salivary glands, the absence of stylets and by skin sculpture, especially by the presence of two longitudinal integumentary ridges on the dorsal mantle. A new species, Adelieledone piatkowski, is described from the Antarctic Peninsula. Beak morphology can discriminate the genera in predator studies.
    PublicationAntarctic Science
    Volume15
    Issue4
    Pages415-424
    Datedécembre 2003
    LanguageEnglish
    DOI10.1017/S0954102003001512
    URLhttp://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0954102003001512
    TagsAntarctica · Cephalopoda · Octopodidae · Pareledone · taxonomy.
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z

  • Boraso, A., Rico, A. E., Perales, S., Pérez, L. & Zalazar, H. Algas marinas de la Patagonia. Una guía ilustrada. (2003).
    itemfields keyXU57E3FE
    Version777
    TypeBook
    TitleAlgas marinas de la Patagonia. Una guía ilustrada
    AuthorBoraso, Alicia
    AuthorRico, Alicia E.
    AuthorPerales, Susana
    AuthorPérez, Laura
    AuthorZalazar, Hilda
    EditionFundación de Historia Natural Félix de Azara
    PlaceBuenos Aires, Republica Argentina
    Date2003
    # of Pages55
    LanguageSpanish
    ISBN950-99787-7-9
    URL
    Date Added2019-01-21T03:38:53Z
    Modified2019-01-21T03:45:45Z
  • De Broyer, C., et al. Structural and ecofunctional biodiversity of the amphipod crustacean benthic taxocoenoses in the Southern Ocean. 1-55 (2003).
    itemfields keyQJFMUA2E
    Version47
    TypeReport
    TitleStructural and ecofunctional biodiversity of the amphipod crustacean benthic taxocoenoses in the Southern Ocean
    AuthorDe Broyer, Claude
    AuthorChapelle, G.
    AuthorDuchesne, P.-A.
    AuthorMunn, R.
    AuthorNyssen, F.
    AuthorScailteur, Y.
    AuthorVan Roozendael, F.
    AuthorDauby, P.
    AbstractWithin the Antarctic Coastal and Shelf Ecosystem (ACSE) the peracarid crustaceans constitute the most diverse animal group in terms of species richness, life styles, trophic types, habitats and size spectra. Using as a model group the amphipod crustaceans –in turn the richest taxon among peracarids with more than 850 species in the Southern Ocean– this study aimed at describing and evaluating the role of the biodiversity of the vagile macrobenthos in the structure and functioning of the Antarctic Coastal and Shelf Ecosystem. In the framework of the SCAR EASIZ programme some key structural and ecofunctional aspects of biodiversity were investigated. Different structural biodiversity features were characterised, namely faunal composition, geographic and bathymetric distribution, habitats and microhabitats, bio-ecological traits. Comparative investigations were performed in two EASIZ benthic reference sites, the eastern Weddell Sea Shelf Community in the High Antarctic, and the Maritime Antarctic sublittoral community of Admiralty Bay, King George Island. In the latter site, species abundance was followed during a complete year cycle, allowing to evidence strong seasonal variations. Gammaridean amphipods appeared ubiquitous in the shelf communities of the eastern Weddell Sea. Their specific habitats were investigated by comparing catches from different collecting gears and by ethological observations in aquaria. Six main habitats were distinguished: endobenthic, epibenthic, hyperbenthic, benthopelagic, pelagic and cryopelagic. Among epibenthic species, which form the bulk of the fauna, three different strata were detected, together with four symbiotic microhabitats. The ecofunctional role of biodiversity was approached through the study of trophic diversity and trophodynamics and the significance of the unusually wide size spectra of the Antarctic amphipod crustaceans. The trophic preferences of 40 dominant amphipod species of the eastern Weddell Sea benthos were deduced from both stomach content analyses and behaviour observations in aquaria. These combined approaches revealed at least eight different feeding types: suspension-feeding, deposit-feeding, deposit-feeding coupled with predation, opportunistic predation, micropredatory browsing, macropredation coupled with scavenging, opportunistic necrophagy and true necrophagy. This feeding type diversity was corroborated by a preliminary analysis of the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Among these eight types, no particular one was dominant. In the same way, types involving microphagy and macrophagy were equally represented. Predatory types (opportunistic or exclusive) accounted for 64% of the analyzed species, while scavenging types (facultative or obligate) accounted for 60%. The overlap suggests that many amphipod species have a wide dietary spectrum and are able to take advantage of different food resources. The impact of the amphipod community on the eastern Weddell Sea shelf ecosystem was approached using feeding type results and biomass data. It appeared that sedimenting plankton particles, crustaceans and fish carrion were the 3 main items consumed by these crustaceans, accounting respectively for 10-27, 22- 32, and 5-18% of the biomass. In addition, a extensive bibliographic investigation was performed in order to estimate the significance of amphipods in the diet of higher trophic levels: 33 species of invertebrates, 48 of birds, 101 of fish and 10 of mammals are regular consumers of amphipods, the share of this type of prey reaching up to 99%. As the Antarctic amphipod size spectrum appeared to be the widest, after Baikal Lake, precise length data were gathered about more than 2,000 amphipod species from 15 sites world wide, from polar to tropical, and from marine to freshwater environments. It was shown that gigantism was not directly related to water temperature as often stated, but instead to oxygen availability. Maximum size increases dramatically with oxygen, modal size increases less, and minimum size does not increase at all. To contribute to a more accurate assessment of the Southern Ocean biodiversity new synthetic tools for compiling, increasing, managing, and disseminating biodiversity information were developed, in particular a "Biodiversity Reference Centre", devoted to Antarctic amphipod crustaceans. It is comprised of comprehensive databases (organising the taxonomic, biogeographic and bioecological information), validated and operational reference collections, and a network of contributing specialists engaged in the taxonomic revision of the Antarctic amphipod fauna and the preparation of new conventional and electronic identification guides. These efforts will facilitate monitoring biodiversity in selected EASIZ reference sites.
    Date2003
    Pages1-55
    URL
    TagsAmphipoda · Antarctic · Biodiversity · Crustacea · Southern Ocean · benthos · gigantism · habitats · trophodynamics
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z
    Note Note
    <p>in: (2003). Belgian Scientific Research programme on the Antarctic, phase 4 (1997-2001), Scientific results: 1. Marine biota and global change. Belgian Federal Public Planning Service Science Policy: Brussel.</p>
  • Giret, A., et al. L’Archipel de Kerguelen : les plus vieilles îles dans le plus jeune océan. Géologues 137, 12-23 (2003).
    itemfields keyG97SKTBD
    Version660
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleL’Archipel de Kerguelen : les plus vieilles îles dans le plus jeune océan
    AuthorGiret, André
    AuthorWeis, Dominique
    AuthorGrégoire, Michel
    AuthorMattielli, Nadine
    AuthorMoine, Bertrand
    AuthorMichon, Gilbert
    AuthorScoates, James S.
    AuthorTourpin, Sylvie
    AuthorDelpech, Guillaume
    AuthorGerbe, Marie Christine
    AuthorDoucet, Sonia
    AuthorEthien, Raynal
    AuthorCottin, Jean-Yves
    PublicationGéologues
    Volume137
    Pages12-23
    Date2003
    URL
    itemfields collectionsArray
    Date Added2019-01-14T17:58:18Z
    Modified2019-01-14T18:04:00Z

  • Griffiths, H. J., Linse, K. & Crame, J. A. SOMBASE - Southern Ocean Mollusc Database. Reference list. Organisms, Diversity & Evolution 3, 1-7 (2003).
    itemfields keyT7ZJPSFN
    Version47
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleSOMBASE - Southern Ocean Mollusc Database. Reference list
    AuthorGriffiths, Huw J.
    AuthorLinse, Katrin
    AuthorCrame, J. Alistair
    PublicationOrganisms, Diversity & Evolution
    Volume3
    Issueelectronic suppl. 12
    Pages1-7
    Date2003
    URLhttp://www.senckenberg.de/odes/03-12.pdf
    Date Added2017-05-05T09:50:24Z
    Modified2017-05-05T15:47:50Z


  • Hense, I., Timmermann, R., Beckmann, A. & Bathmann, U. V. Regional and interannual variability of ecosystem dynamics in the Southern Ocean. Ocean Dynamics 53, 1-10 (2003).
    itemfields keyRCC8PJVD
    Version453
    TypeJournal Article
    TitleRegional and interannual variability of ecosystem dynamics in the Southern Ocean
    AuthorHense, Inga
    AuthorTimmermann, Ralph
    AuthorBeckmann, Aike
    AuthorBathmann, Ulrich V.
    PublicationOcean Dynamics
    Volume53
    Issue1
    Pages1-10
    Date2003-2-1
    DOI10.1007/s10236-002-0015-6
    ISSN1616-7341, 1616-7228
    URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10236-002-0015-6
    Accessed2018-10-04T17:31:47Z
    Library CatalogCrossref
    Date Added2018-10-04T17:31:47Z
    Modified2018-10-04T17:31:47Z

  • Hommersand, M. H. & Fredericq, S. Biogeograohy of the red seaweeds of the South African west coast: a molecular approach. Proceedim:s XVIIth International Seaweed Symposium 325-336 (Oxford University Press, 2003).at
    itemfields keyUHXAG5TA
    Version1236
    TypeConference Paper
    TitleBiogeograohy of the red seaweeds of the South African west coast: a molecular approach
    AuthorHommersand, Max H.
    AuthorFredericq, Suzanne
    Date2003
    Proceedings TitleProceedim:s XVIIth International Seaweed Symposium
    Conference NameXVIIth International Seaweed Symposium
    PlaceCape Town 2001
    PublisherOxford University Press
    Pages325-336
    LanguageEnglish
    URLhttps://www.researchgate.net/publication/262731611_Biogeography_of_the_red_seaweeds_of_the_South_African_west_coast_a_molecular_approach/download
    Date Added2019-02-24T13:32:10Z
    Modified2019-02-24T13:42:12Z

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biblio|annee|csl=marine biology|export=non|details=complet|afficher_id=oui
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This section’s articles

Thursday 2 August 2018
by  Jean-Pierre FERAL

Kerguelen (and other sub-Antarctic and Antarctic islands/territories) useful references (sorted by authors)

REFERENCE ARTICLES AND BOOKS (no date).
Abele, D., Brey, T. & Philipp, E. Bivalve models of aging and the determination of molluscan lifespans. Experimental gerontology 44, 307-15 (...)

Tuesday 14 August 2018
by  Jean-Pierre FERAL

Proteker output

Proteker output
Proteker output
Peer-reviewed Journals
2018
Chenuil A, Saucède T, Hemery L, Eléaume M, Féral J-P, Améziane N, David B, Lecointre G, Havermans C. 2018. Understanding processes at the origin of species flocks with a focus on the marine Antarctic fauna. Biological Reviews, 93: (...)

Monday 20 August 2018
by  Jean-Pierre FERAL

Theses related to Kerguelen Islands (PhD and master)

1973
Patrick Arnaud: Contribution à la bionomie marine benthique des régions antarctiques et subantarctiques. Marseille, thèse de doctorat ès sciences naturelles 1976
Daniel Desbruyères: Cycle biologique de quelques annélides polychètes en milieu sub-antarctique, thèse de 3ème cycle (PhD) (...)

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